Compare textbook rental prices to new, used, and etextbooks:
Play the 20 second video.

Learn how to save money.

In a hurry?

Use the search box above to find cheap books.

Lulu.com is making a run at the ebook business

Lulu.com, more recently focused on helping authors publish their own ebooks, is now making a decided push into the ebook rental market.

Bob Young, head dishwasher at Lulu.com, states the following:

“Beginning today, you will find more than 700,000 new titles in the Lulu Marketplace, titles as diverse as Harlan Coben’s Caught from the list of New York Times bestsellers to Blink by Malcolm Gladwell. This follows the addition of more than 200,000 traditionally published eBooks that we added in November. In the coming weeks, we’ll add more content through additional partnerships as we make Lulu.com the world’s premier destination for published knowledge, ideas and expression. In effect, we are creating the world’s biggest bookstore.”

They are also bolstering their search functionality and improving their publishing platform, though if you read the comments they are obviously still working out some kinks.

The full article can be read here.

Please let us know if you have used Lulu.com to purchase an ebook or publish your work.  You can comment after this article or create a discussion in our group/forums area as Lulu.com has been added to our company database.

Comments

  1. I’m not sure what you mean by “rental”, but I will try to explain how Lulu works. It is primarily a self-service publisher of books and ebooks in various formats which is paid to do so by its member authors. Most of the ebooks available on the site are for outright sale, not rent. This means that once you buy a file it is yours. The only exception may be if you purchase an ebook for iPad or other mobile device, which means that the price you pay is for the hosting service for that book. The way Kindle works, for example, is that you pay the price for the ebook and Amazon then allows you to store it on your Kindle “in perpetuity”, or until you change devices. It is not yours to keep. But Lulu is growing too big too fast, and it is leaving its primary author core, the ones who use their service to self-publish or for small press print runs, behind in favor of importing books from outside, which creates direct competition for them. Now I have read that they planning to present an IPO to the Canadian stock market, when they are not big enough to do it (112 employees? is that all?). These kinds of plans have basically thrown a monkey wrench into its core authors’ works, and as you have probably read from the support forums (which used be more socially focused and community based), there are many complaints from users both new and old about their customer service, their order fulfillment irregularities, and their general lack of commitment to service and quality. You have to realize that the only reason a company issues an IPO in the first place is to generate enough capital to continue to operate. I see this as a last ditch effort to legitimize themselves and keep from going under altogether, only they have been too chicken to admit it. I have been the only one (or so it seems) who has had the ovaries to confront them about my books and ebooks, which suffer from lack of sales because they keep moving the titles around on the catalog. The least they could have done was to email us authors about it, but they did not. This is typical of their modus operandus, which is becoming more and more like Amazon every day. Amazon is notorious for lack of response to anything which does not concern Amazon or its core values, which is “ignore everybody, including customers”. Lulu has become a much less friendly and customer-centric publisher, which is why I am contemplating moving to Createspace. Don’t get me wrong about the quality of their conversion engine or their printing quality, which are stellar, but these things are apparently governed by outside concerns and have nothing to do with Lulu’s actual operating procedures, which is basically dismal.

  2. I’m not sure what you mean by “rental”, but I will try to explain how Lulu works. It is primarily a self-service publisher of books and ebooks in various formats which is paid to do so by its member authors. Most of the ebooks available on the site are for outright sale, not rent. This means that once you buy a file it is yours. The only exception may be if you purchase an ebook for iPad or other mobile device, which means that the price you pay is for the hosting service for that book. The way Kindle works, for example, is that you pay the price for the ebook and Amazon then allows you to store it on your Kindle “in perpetuity”, or until you change devices. It is not yours to keep. But Lulu is growing too big too fast, and it is leaving its primary author core, the ones who use their service to self-publish or for small press print runs, behind in favor of importing books from outside, which creates direct competition for them. Now I have read that they planning to present an IPO to the Canadian stock market, when they are not big enough to do it (112 employees? is that all?). These kinds of plans have basically thrown a monkey wrench into its core authors’ works, and as you have probably read from the support forums (which used be more socially focused and community based), there are many complaints from users both new and old about their customer service, their order fulfillment irregularities, and their general lack of commitment to service and quality. You have to realize that the only reason a company issues an IPO in the first place is to generate enough capital to continue to operate. I see this as a last ditch effort to legitimize themselves and keep from going under altogether, only they have been too chicken to admit it. I have been the only one (or so it seems) who has had the ovaries to confront them about my books and ebooks, which suffer from lack of sales because they keep moving the titles around on the catalog. The least they could have done was to email us authors about it, but they did not. This is typical of their modus operandus, which is becoming more and more like Amazon every day. Amazon is notorious for lack of response to anything which does not concern Amazon or its core values, which is “ignore everybody, including customers”. Lulu has become a much less friendly and customer-centric publisher, which is why I am contemplating moving to Createspace. Don’t get me wrong about the quality of their conversion engine or their printing quality, which are stellar, but these things are apparently governed by outside concerns and have nothing to do with Lulu’s actual operating procedures, which is basically dismal.

  3. free government grant says:

    this post is very usefull thx!

  4. mcmase18 says:

    Not much of an e-reader, still enjoy the physical aspect of a textbook.

Speak Your Mind

*